Master Your Marketing: Part 2 of 3

This series is authored by Claire Broadley, of wish.co.uk.

This week, we’re discussing ways to make the most of your event marketing. Today’s post is about making the most of WordPress. Read Part One of the series, on writing your event description and page. Check back on Monday for the final part of the series.

Pump up your ‘Press

WordPress is great for event listings because it’s so flexible.

You can extend your installation of WordPress with a number of plugins to enhance its effectiveness once your post goes live. This doesn’t apply to users who have a blog on WordPress.com, but if you host your own installation of WordPress, it’s definitely worth looking at plugin repositories to see if there’s anything you could use.

To enhance your SEO, try WordPress SEO by Yoast to enhance your content and the All-in-One SEO Pack to optimize your site structure. To allow users to easily share your event page on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn and increase your traffic, make sure you install the AddThis plugin.

Finally, grab a free Google Analytics account and add the Google Analytics for WordPress plugin to monitor your traffic and see how people are finding your event page. This information can help you to figure out which marketing channels are working and which are a waste of time. It’s free, and it’s hugely powerful.

There are also a few events plugins for WordPress which can give your event a boost. The EventCalendar plugin allows you to harness the WordPress calendar and use it as an events machine, showing all your upcoming events in various formats. It even allows users to export a live feed to iCal or Google Calendar. The Events Calendar and, for Eventbrite specific support, the Eventbrite for The Events Calendar may be useful.

The golden rule with plugins is to go slowly. They are all made by different people, and sometimes they don’t play nicely together.

Start with one. Install it, thoroughly test it and make sure it doesn’t cause any problems with the rest of your blog. Then, install the next one. It’s much harder to solve plugin problems when you have lots of them all interacting and you can’t figure out the likely culprit.

Do you have a blog or web page? Tell us about it on Facebook or Twitter.

Hosting an event? Check out Eventbrite, and see how easy it can be!