How to design your Eventbrite page: 5 examples of success

We love to fill you in on the great features that live in and around your Eventbrite page—we’re gadget geeks like that. But we don’t often highlight one central aspect of the attendee’s signup experience: the way your page looks. We should. Your page is a huge opportunity to draw in attendees with strong visuals and enticing details about the event.

The real beauty of your Eventbrite page is that it’s truly yours. You’re free to stick with the clean original theme, choose between backdrops, and of course trick out your page with all kinds of unique branding and design schemes. It’s really up to you and your creativity.

Below are some upcoming events with pages we found especially eye-catching. Some of these clearly involve some web-design savvy. Others simply use great photos, sharp logos, or strong layout to make the case for an event. Click through to see how each of these has done an awesome job making the most of Eventbrite’s blank slate!

  • 2010 Vendy Awards We love the photo effect and design at the top of this page. But a simpler touch—the snapshots of street vendors along the bottom—is also very effective, personalizing the event and reminding attendees of the worthy cause.
  • Leaders of Tomorrow Program This page shows what sheer size can do: that wide photo at the top draws us in and makes us want to hit the rapids right now! The video on the page is also a great way to create an interactive experience.
  • Chico Brew Fest w/ Little Feat Strong colors, great branding—this one’s just plain snazzy. Plus, the group also put their special draw—the legendary band Little Feat—right in the event title, where no-one could miss it.
  • 2010 Russian River Beer Festival and BBQ Cookoff What we love about this one is that it shows how effective a fairly basic layout can be. Beyond the sharp logo, the organizers have simply made great use of different ticket types, included a Google map, and described the event in clear, large and visually bold terms. Potential attendees instantly know what the event is all about, and why they should go.
  • JULEPS IN JUNE, 2010 This page is strongly branded with a unique color, and uses photos and original copy to really “tell the story” of the event. It almost reads like a post on your favorite blog (ahem). And the best part: Does that color subtly remind you of anything? Mint, perhaps?